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Don Shipp

aka: Shipper - Colorado

 

Originally a Texas bass fisherman, I grew up fishing the “red-neck” way as taught to me by my great-grandmother. She would take me to her favorite tank (Texan for pond) and encourage me to catch as many as I could -- for dinner -- the neighbors or just for fertilizer for the garden. Later on, I would spend days fishing the great State of Texas searching for the elusive “hawg.”

Texas has some of the finest bass lakes anywhere; Lake Fork, Sam Rayburn, Lake of the Pines, Texhoma and Toledo Bend to name a few. My “hawg” came when I was 14, on Falcon Reservoir. A 10-½ pound black bass beauty caught on the Mexico side of the lake.

I relocated to Colorado, truly God’s country, a little over 9 years ago. I have become obsessed with the art and beauty of fly-fishing. I only wish I had discovered fly-fishing sooner. I have come to appreciate and protect these precious resources and have become Catch & Release only. 

I travel in my job, so I am able to fish some of the great rivers of the Rocky Mountain West.  My home waters are the Big Thompson, a wild trout fishery, about 20 minutes from home.  There’s a “tank” out back of the house that has a few carp and those little blue gills my grandmother loved so much.

I love the Salmonfly hatch on the Colorado River and will make an annual pilgrimage to the Roaring Fork & Frying Pan Rivers each year.

I really enjoy tying & swapping flies and am always striving to get better.  I also build a fly rod or two each year for friends and family.

“I’ve fished most of my life—the rest of the time I just wasted.”

 Select One of Don's Flies:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)

WD-40

Royal Stimulator
(With Instructions)

Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

 

Clouser Minnow
A Step-by-Step Tutorial

By: Don Shipp

Hook:  Mustad 3406B, Sizes #1 to #2/0.
Thread:
  6/0 chartreuse.
Eyes:
  Small lead barbells painted white w/black pupils.
Belly:
  White bucktail.
Wing:
  Pearl Krystal Flash over which is chartreuse bucktail.
Nose:
  6/0 chartreuse thread.

Quite possibly one of the best known, most used patterns anywhere in the world.  This fly can be tied in just about any color combination you can think of to match the specific baitfish your trying to imitate.  The Clouser minnow is incredibly easy to tie, even for beginners.

Bob Clouser created the Clouser Minnow in 1984 by attaching some metallic "dumb-bells" in order to turn the fly upside down.  This insured that snagging would be minimal.  Deer hair was used to give the minnow it's shape and flash material was added in the center of the fly to add luster and life to the pattern.  What makes the pattern so effective is, during the retrieve the fly never stops moving, up and down, side to side, imitating the movement of baitfish.  Tied in various sizes and colors, the Clouser can be used just about anywhere in the world.

Tying Instructions

 

1) Place the hook upright in the vise and secure the thread on the shank approx. 1/3 way back from the hook eye. Construct a notch or cradle with 2 "bumps" of tying thread.

 

 

 

2) Place the eyes in the cradle and secure by wrapping the thread diagonally across the eyes, alternating wraps from the left and right side of the eyes in an “X” pattern to align them.  Apply a drop of head cement.

 

 

 

3) Secure a sparse amount of White Buck-tail between the eye of the hook and the eyes; wrap the thread forward to create a small cone-shaped nose. Wrap the thread back behind the eyes and pull the buck-tail across the eyes and secure buck-tail.

 

 

 

 

4) Holding the White Buck-tail up, spiral wrap the thread (fairly loosely) to secure the Buck-tail on top of the hook for approx. 2/3 the length of the shaft.  Wrap the thread forward to a point in front the eyes.

 

 

 

 

 

5) Turn the hook over in the vise (or rotary) so the hook point is riding up.  Tie in a sparse amount Pearl Krystal Flash at a point just in front of the eyes. Add a drop of head in cement. Wrap several turns of  the thread to secure. 

 

 

 

6) Now, tie in a sparse amount of Chartreuse Buck-tail, also in front of the eyes and trim ends.

 

 

 

 

7) Over-wrap the nose w/thread forming a neat cone-shaped nose and whip finish.  Seal with head cement or “Hard-As-Nails” finger nail polish.  Finished fly pictured above.

 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

 

Brook Trout Clouser

A Clouser Minnow Variation for Trout

Created by Don Shipp

 

 

Hook:  Mustad 3406B, Sizes #1 to #2/0.

Thread:  Whte Uni-thread 6/0.

Eyes:  Small lead barbells painted white with black pupils.

Belly:  White bucktail (sparse) over which is tan bucktail (sparse).

Under-wing:  A few strands of pink Krystal Flash over which is orange bucktail (sparse).

Wing:  Black bucktail (sparse) over which is peacock FisHair or other similar greenish-blue product  (sparse).

Nose:  Fire orange Uni-thread 6/0 and a single-strand orange floss.

 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

 

Little Brook Trout Streamer

Tier:  Don Shipp

 

HookDaiichi #1750, 4x Long, Sizes 4, 6, 8.

Thread:  Danville 6/0, Black.

Tail:  Red floss or yarn over which is bright green bucktail.

Rib:  Narrow flat silver tinsel.

Body:  Cream Superfine dubbing.

Throat:  Orange bucktail.

Wing:  White bucktail, over which is orange bucktail, over which is bright green bucktail, 4-6 strands of rainbow Flashabou Accent, over which is badger hair.

Cheeks:  Jungle cock nails (optional).

Head:  Black thread.

Eyes:  Acrylic paint (coated with epoxy or Sally Hansen's).

 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

 

Prince John

Tier:  Don Shipp

Hook:  TMC 5263 # 8 - 16.
Head:  Copper bead.
Thread:  Black 6/0.
Tail:   Two brown goose biots (forked).
Body:  Med. copper wire 2/3 shank length.
Thorax:  Two peacock herl (roped).
Hackle:  Brown furnace clipped at the top.
Wing:  Two white goose biots (flared).

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

 

Salmonfly Adult

Tier:  Don Shipp

 

Hook:  TMC 5263 # 4, 6, 8.

Thread:  Black 6/0.

Tail:  Dark elk, tied along entire shank to form level underbody.

Rib:  Fluorescent fire orange single strand floss.

Body:  Audiocassette tape, lacquered after the orange floss is in place.

Wing:  Dark elk.

Hackle:  1 grizzly, 1 brown.

 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

 

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

(Pteronarcys Californica)

Tier:  Don Shipp

HOOK:  TMC 200R # 4, 6, 8
UNDERBODY:  .025 lead wire.  (
12-14 turns at Thorax)
THREAD:  Cream or white 6/0.
TAIL:  White (2) forked.
RIB:  Orange thread.
BODY:  Cigarette filter,
shredded and brushed-out .  (smoked or non-smoked)
WINGCASE:  Mottled turkey quill.  (light tan coated with Hard-as-Nails)
THORAX:  Cigarette filter, shredded and brushed-out.
HACKLE: White or Cree, palmered thru thorax.
HEAD: Orange thread.
 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

 

Salmonfly Nymph

Tier:  Don Shipp

 

Hook:  Dai-Riki 730  # 4, 6, 8 - 2x long.
Tread:  Orange 6/0.
Tail:
  Brown goose biots, (2) splayed.
Rib:
  Orange single strand floss.

Body:  Brown muskrat or rabbit dubbing.

Wingcase:  Dark brown mottled turkey quill.

Thorax:  Peacock herl (3) strands, roped.

Hackle:  Brown or furnace (palmered thru thorax, cut off top).

Weight:  .025 lead wire 8-10 turns (optional). 

 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

Tragopan Red
Don Shipp


 

Hook:  Klinkhamar G/S Special, 12, 14.
Thread:  Danville 6/0, Red.
Tag:  Krystal Flash, Red.
Body:  Peacock Herls, 3 from the eye.
Wings:  Cabot’s Tragopan feather.
Head:  Red Thread, sealed w/Hard-as-Nails.

 

 

Note: Instructional pictures below show how to tie this fly:

 

 

 


Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

 

Winston Caddis Larvae

Ryacophila

By: Don Shipp

At the risk of making an "ash" of myself, I've always enjoyed experimenting with different and "non-standard" tying materials.

Back in early January it was unseasonably warm (mid 60's) here in Colorado, so I snuck out for a couple of hours to a local stream and found about a million and a half Caddis Larvae in and around the rocks.  Some call them Sandfies, but technically, it's a Rhyacophillia dorsalis.  The Sandfly is one of a small number of sedge (caddis) flies who's larva is free swimming rather than case builders.  The larvae typically live in fast and medium paced rivers; they forage for food as dusk descends.

Luckily, on this outing, I had a couple of my "Winston Caddis Larva" patterns with me and I must have caught 15 or 16 rainbows in a span of 90 minutes.  I call it a "Winston Caddis Larvae" because its tied with a Winston cigarette filter.  This dubbing can be used. whether smoked or non-smoked, for a variety of patterns.  It will also absorb Prismacolor permanent markers nicely, to match the color of bugs in your area.

With all the lead weight, it gets down quick and stays down.  Fish it in a dead drift, right through the pool.  You got Caddis "worms" in your area?  Try this guy.

Instructions

Hook: Klinkhamar G/S Special  #12, 14.

Underbody: Lead Wire (.015) wrapped entire shank, doubled at thorax.

Thread: Cream 6/0.

Rib: 6 lb. Mono.

Casing: 1/8 Scud Back (clear).

Body: Cigarette Filter (smoked & shredded).

Thorax: Dark Hare’s Ear.

Head: Black thread 6/0.

 

 

Tying Steps

 

 1)    Place hook in vise and thread lead wire through the eye, extending approx 1” of wire through the eye. Wrap wire the entire length of the shaft, then clear the eye of wire and wrap back over the underbody at the thorax.  Coat w/lacquer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2)    Wrap thread to rear of hook and tie in a length of 6 lb. Mono and a length of clear

scud back material.

 

 

 

 

3)    Shred a smoked cigarette and dub onto thread and wrap forward to the doubled lead wire. Throw in a half hitch, cut thread and tie on the black thread.

 

 

 

 

 

4)    Dub the black thread w/hare’s ear and wrap to form a thorax.

 

 

 

 

 

 

5)    Pull scud back over the body and tie off at the head.

 

 

6)    Wrap mono forward forming a rib.

 

 

7)    Form a head of black thread, whip finish and cement.

 

 

8)    With a dubbing needle or toothbrush, pluck out the cigarette filter and hare’s ear.

 

 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

 

WD-40

Tier:  Don Shipp

 

The WD - 40 is used to imitate the Imago stage of a mayfly or baetis nymph. It can also be used as a  Blue Wing Olive nymph or midge imitation.  It can be tied in a variety of colors from red, gray, black, olive or rusty brown.

 

The "WD" stands for wood duck, which is the material used for the tail and wing-case of this fly. It is basically simple in design but very effective on tail-waters when the trout are moving up in the water column prior to a hatch.  I also have tied a flash-back version using pearl Krystal flash for the wing-case.

 

The WD-40 was originally developed by John Engler on the Frying Pan River as an emerging midge pattern, but can be used just about anywhere. Fish the WD-40 in a dead-drift as a midge pupa with split-shot and a strike indicator. Let it swing at the end of the drift and rise towards the surface as an emerging nymph would do. I have found most strikes occur at this time, so be ready!

 

Recipe

Hook:  Tiemco 2488 Sizes 16 - 24.

Thread:  8/0 Rusty Brown (or color to match Thorax).

Tail:  Wood Duck flank.

Body:  Thread.

Thorax:  Rusty Brown Hare's Ear dubbing (or color to match).

Wing-case:  Wood Duck flank pulled over thorax.

 

Instructions

 

1) Start the thread close to the eye and wrap towards the bend of the hook.  Tie in about 5 to 7 wood duck flank barbules for the tail. Wrap the thread all the way back towards the head forming the body of the fly with the thread.

 

2) Pull the butt ends of the wood duck feathers back over the body so that they are aiming towards the tail. Wrap the thread towards the back leaving enough room for the thorax (about 1/3 of the length of the hook).

 

3) Dub the thread for the thorax (or tie in peacock herl) and wrap towards the eye of the hook and tie off.

 

4) Pull the wood duck ends over the thorax to form the wing-case and tie off. Cut off the ends of the wood duck and whip finish the head of the fly.  Add a drop of head cement.

 

5) Brush or pick-out the dubbing to simulate legs.

 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

 

Stimulator

A Step-by-Step Tutorial

By: Don Shipp

Royal Stimulator

Hook:  Tiemco 220R, sizes 4 to 18.
Thread:   Fluorescent fire orange 6/0.
Tail:  Light or dark elk.
Rib:
  Fine gold wire.
Abdomen:
  Royal = 1/3 Peacock herl,
1/3 red floss, 1/3 peacock herl, with
brown hackle palmered through abdomen.
Additional Colors: 
Olive, black, yellow, orange,
green, and tan, with brown hackle palmered through abdomen.
Wing:
  Light elk or dark elk with white calf over-wing (optional).
Thorax
Orange, yellow or cream dubbing.
Hackle
Grizzly palmered through thorax.
Nose:  Fluorescent fire orange 6/0 thread, whipped finished.

The Stimulator is quite possibly one of the more popular and versatile patterns used in the United States.  Randall Kaufmann introduced the Stimulator pattern.  It is very much a knock-off of an earlier pattern called the Improved Sofa Pillow. 

 

The original Sofa Pillow was created by a fly fisherman/tier named Par Barnes, in the 1940’s.  As the story goes, Pat was guiding a group of Texans who, for the life of them, couldn’t catch a thing using small trout flies.  To solve the dilemma, Pat tied up a huge stonefly imitation using some random material lying around of his tying desk.  One of the Texans’ drawled, “Why, it’s as big as a sofa piller,” and the fly was so named.  Later on in the 1950’s, Barnes  made minor changes in the fly using a clipped palmered body hackle and renamed it the “Super Sofa Pillow” which later became known as the "Improved Sofa Pillow". 

 

Kaufmann’s Stimulator became popular more through the marketing efforts of Randall Kaufmann.  By merely changing the color of materials and adding various sizes, he created a pattern that has a wide variety of applications.  The larger sizes are used to imitate large stoneflies or salmonflies or maybe grasshoppers.  While in smaller sizes, the Stimulator is used for Caddis imitations.  

 

The Stimulator is truly a great pattern.  I keep a large supply of them on hand at all times and find myself tying one on when nothing else seems to be working.  If for no other reason, it makes a great edible “strike indicator” with a dropper nymph tied on below.  I like to use a Royal Stimulator with my Royal Prince nymph,  tied on as a dropper for searching out those fussy trout.

 

Gene Hall, of Cody, Wyoming,  (wildgene)  has some great variations you should check out at: http://www.fishingwithflies.com/Stimulators.html    

                                                                                                       

I hope these instructions and accompanying photos will help you feel more comfortable in tying this truly remarkable trout fly.  If you have any questions,  please feel free to e-mail me at shiper@aol.com  
 

 TYING STEPS

1)  Start off  by wrapping a nice even base of thread starting near the eye of the hook and extending to the point where you are going to tie in the tail.   This point should be roughly even with the barb of the hook.
 

 

 

 

2)   Take a small clump of Elk hair and pick-out or brush the “fuzzy” under-fur from the cut end.  Pick out and discard any extremely long hairs, then place tips into the hair-stacker, as shown.  With your index finger covering the top opening, gently tap the hair-stacker several times to enable the tips to stack evenly. Next, tilt the stacker at a 45-degree angle and tap a couple of times to  consolidate the tips into an even-tipped bundle, as shown.  

3)     Hold the hair-stacker horizontal and remove the barrel with your right hand.  Do this gently, to avoid disturbing the hairs.  With your left hand, grasp the tips and remove them.  The tips have now been aligned and are ready to mount.  
 

4)    Tie in the tail, roughly equal to the gape of the hook.  I prefer the tail a little fuller than most.   Make several “soft turns” towards the hook eye to secure, then reverse wrap towards the rear using tighter wraps as you  wrap towards the rear.


 

5)    Next, take a length of  Fine Gold Wire and secure it to the hook at the rear of the fly.  The wire should be tied in so that it protrudes out the rear of the fly and is out of the  way for  constructing the remainder of the fly.  


 

 

This next procedure is for a Royal Stimulator.  For one of the other versions of the Stimulator, you would dub the thread, at this step, with the appropriate color of dubbing for the Abdomen.  
 

6)    Tie in a thick piece of Peacock herl and wrap the thread forward towards the eye approximately 1/3 of the Abdomen length. With Peacock herl, always try to tie in the herl  so that the thick part of the herl is facing outward. 


 

 


7)    Now wrap the Peacock herl forward to the point where you stopped the thread and tie the Peacock herl off at that point. At this point, tie in a strand of Red Single Strand Nylon Floss and then wrap the tread forward another 1/3 of the Abdomen length. 

 

 

8)    Wrap the nylon floss forward to the point where you stopped the thread  make a couple of  wraps to secure the floss and tie in another  piece of Peacock herl.  Again, wrap the thread forward for the final 1/3 of the Abdomen length.  

 

 

 

9)    Wrap the Peacock herl forward to the point where you stopped the thread and tie the herl off  with a couple of thread wraps. 


 

 

 

10)    Take a Brown piece of Saddle Hackle and tie in with several wraps of thread.  Try to tie the hackle stem on top of the hook. Leave the thread hanging at this point. 

 

 

 

11)    Next, grasps the tip of the hackle with your hackle pliers and begin spiral wrapping  (palmered) the hackle towards the rear of the hook.


 

 

 

 

12)  Hackle to the rear, where the tail is, let the hackle pliers drop straight down  and take the fine gold wire and wrap forward locking the hackle in place.  Carefully, zig-zag the wire through the hackle in order not to crush the hackle down as much as possible. 

 

 

 

 

13)   Once the wire has been wrapped back through the hackle to the last section of Peacock herl, wrap the wire 2 or 3 times around the hook and tie off with thread.  The Tail and Abdomen are now complete.

14)   Now for the wing:  Take a nice clump of Elk hair and stack as you did for the tail in Steps 2 and 3 above.  As you can see in the photo, you should measure the wing so that  it is roughly even with the end of the fly's abdomen.  To tie in the wing, first, make a  couple of loops  with the thread around the hair only at the cut ends (not the hook), then cinch the hair onto the hook with a few turns of the thread.  Wrap a few more turns of thread towards the eye, then back again.  Here, I put a couple of drops of head cement to hold the wing in  place.  

 


 

 

15)   Next, tie in a nice piece of Grizzly Saddle Hackle as you did before with the Brown Hackle. Tie the feather in so that it extends towards the rear of the fly with the shiny side facing you.  Wrap a few turns of thread to secure and trim the excess stem.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

16) 

 

 

 

 

 

17)   Now, grasp the tip of the Grizzly hackle with your hackle pliers and spiral wrap (palmer) towards the eye with 3 or 4 turns and then tie the hackle off using several wraps of thread. Trim off the excess hackle and whip finish to form an orange nose.  Add a couple of drops of head cement and there you have it.  

 

 

Other Stimulator Variations

 

Yellow Stimulator

 

Black Stimulator w/legs

 

 

 

 

Olive Stimulator

 

"Uncle Sam-ulator"
--tied for the Red, White & Blue Swap
9/11/01

 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

 

Pale Morning Dun

Tier:  Don Shipp

 

One of the great hatches of the West, Pale Morning Duns have everything going for them: Massive numbers that trigger aggressive surface feeding; a presence on nearly all the waters of the west; fussy enough to offer a challenge, but not so difficult as to be too frustrating; and they occur during the summer months when fishing is at its most pleasant.

 

This small, pale-yellow mayfly of the crawler group is often referred to by its initials, PMD.  Despite the name, hatches can occur in the morning, early afternoon, or evening.  It's not unusual to have both morning and evening emergences on the same day.  The hatch season begins as early as April and can last as late as September, depending on the stream.  This is often the dominant hatch where and when it occurs.

 

I never go to the Big Thompson or Rocky Mountain National Park without a full box of PMD’s.

 

Hook:  Mustad 94840, sizes 16, 18, 20.
Thread8/0 pale olive.
Tail
Light dun hackle fibers.
Body
Pale yellow Superfine dubbing.
WingsMedium dun hackle tips.
Head
Thread
.

 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

MacSalmon

Pteronarcys  californica

 

Tier: Don Shipp

Salmonflies (Pteronarcys  californica) also known as a Giant Stonefly or Willowfly  are great fly fishing in the early months of Spring and Summer.  The Nymphs and Adults are huge and huge trout love them.  Out here in the West, they are a staple for big fish during their brief hatch period (mid-May to mid-June).  As with most stoneflies, they emerge on land and spend several weeks crawling around looking for a mate.  They usually find the water by being blown  from bank-side vegetation, so the best place to cast a Salmonfly imitation is next to the bank with a downstream presentation. 
 

The MacSalmon fly was created by Al Troth.  Stoneflies, especially Salmonflies are my favorite.  I look forward to them each year, although some years they do not appear at all.
 

See also: Salmonfly Adult, Salmonfly Nymph and Albino Salmonfly Nymph.
 

Recipe for MacSalmon
 

Hook:  TMC 200R – Sizes 2, 4 & 6                    TMC 200R – Sizes 2, 4 & 6                 

Thread:   Black 6/0

Abdomen: 1) Orange close-cell foam.

Thread onto a needle and tie off 5 or 6 segments with fire orange single strand floss. Then thread onto hook leaving 2 segments extending past the hook bend.  Or...

                            2) Orange braided macramé cording.

Thread onto hook leaving some extending past the hook bend.  Melt the butt-end with a lighter.

Underwing: A few strands of Krystal Flash (orange & black)

                        Then a formed stonefly wing using Shimazaki

                        Fly Wing #11 or any  wing material. (see note below)

                        Wing should extend a little past the abdomen.

Overwing:  Light elk hair over which is Orange-dyed elk hair.

Head Dark moose tied bullet style. Ends make a collar

Legs:  Black round rubber, tied in with fire orange

 single strand floss.

 

Note:  Shimazaki Fly Wing is a material once produce by Umpqua Feather Merchants.  I have been unable to locate any in years, however, a fellow FF’er on FAOL was nice enough to send me some of his “left-overs.” There are other winging materials, such as Web Wing in Medium Dun color, that will work just as well.  Available at Fly Tying World's Store. 

 

Select Another Fly:

Clouser Minnow (With Instructions)
Brook Trout Clouser
Little Brook Trout Streamer
Prince John

Salmonfly Adult

Salmonfly Albino Nymph

Salmonfly Nymph

Tragopan Red

Winston Caddis Larvae
(With Instructions)
WD-40

Stimulator
(With Instructions)
Yellow Stimulator
Black Stimulator with Legs
Olive Stimulator
Uncle Sam-ulator

Pale Morning Dun

MacSalmon

Return to Don's Introduction.

   

 

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